Informal, Non-formal, and Formal Networking: Ensuring Autonomy and Flexibility for Special Needs Coordinators

Alison Claire Kearney

Abstract


The importance of the Special Needs Coordinator (SENCO) in facilitating inclusive and equitable education is well supported in the literature with many countries formalising the role through legislation and policy. New Zealand however, while adopting the role of SENCO, has not formalised this role, meaning that those in SENCO positions in New Zealand experience high levels of flexibility and autonomy. This paper reports on a study of New Zealand SENCO, highlighting their day-to-day workings. A model of networked SENCO expertise is presented that reinforces SENCO autonomy and flexibility while also facilitating their needs for collaboration, sharing of practice and ongoing professional learning.

  


Keywords


inclusive education; life-long learning; networked expertise; professional practice, SENCO

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References


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Copyright (c) 2017 Alison Claire Kearney

The New Zealand Journal of Teachers' work is supported by AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand.